The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Daily British Whig (Kingston, ON), 18 Nov 1856


Description
Full Text

not published

Nov. 19, 1856

p.2 FURTHER EFFECTS OF THE STORM

Supposed Loss of the Steamer Superior, with All on Board - Other Vessels Missing

Buffalo, Nov. 12th - The propeller Manhattan arrived at Cleveland yesterday, with advices to the 20th ult. from Superior City. The Captain says he has never known such a continued series of terrible gales as he has encountered in this trip. The steamer Superior, bound up from Chicago, with a full load of freight and passengers, left the Canal on the 15th, since which time she has not been seen or heard of. The schooner E.C. Roberts, which left Portage on the 30th ult., and the steamer Lady Elgin, which left St. Mary's River for Chicago on the 3rd inst., have not been heard of, and it is stated they are also lost.

The Late Gale - It is estimated that the loss of property on Lake Ontario by the recent gale, will reach $150,000. Twenty or thirty vessels received more or less damage.

One of the Ottawa papers states that the propeller Mercury, owned by Messrs. Robertson, Jones & Co., was sunk a few miles below Grenville on Saturday the 1st inst. It is said that there was no insurance on either the vessel or her cargo.

Shipwreck and Loss of Life - We regret to be informed by a correspondent of the wreck of the brig Ellen Gilmour, E.J. Brown master, on Long Point, on the morning of Saturday last, and of the melancholy loss of four lives - those of the captain, his son and two seamen. The vessel went ashore about a mile east of the cut, and went to pieces in the course of the day. Shortly after she struck, Captain Brown and his son were washed overboard and drowned in endeavoring to get ashore from the wreck. The schooner Wave, of Pigeon Bay, Captain J. Anglum, was lying wind bound with several other vessels at Port Rowan. Immediately on the grounding of the Ellen Gilmour being perceived, got under weigh and went to her assistance. Capt. Anglum fortunately succeeded in bringing five of the crew safely ashore, before the vessel went to pieces, being assisted by Mr. Bantem, who piloted the Wave out to the wreck, and a family living on the Point, named Becker, who lighted a fire and aided in bringing the crew ashore. The Wave brought the survivors of the wreck into Port Rowan, where they were hospitably treated by Mr. Stearns, of Stearn's Hotel. The Wave went out next day in search of the bodies of the unfortunate men who were drowned, but did not find any of them. Much credit is due to Capt. Anglum. Although the Wave is but a small schooner of 20 tons burden, and although himself a stranger to that shore, he did not hesitate for a moment, when he saw the vessel aground, about going to her assistance. The names of the drowned are:- Edward J. Brown, Captain; Edward Brown, the captain's son; Felix Debitt, seaman, and William McRay, seaman. The names of the saved are:- Joseph Gruett, mate; Patrick Comorton, steward; Patrick Hurley, Mathew Doyle, and Joseph Rinsloy, seamen. [Globe]

The gale which occurred on Lake Ontario last week, proves to have been of unusual severity. It is estimated that the loss of property will amount to $150,000, but will probably be more. The number of vessels damaged or lost is supposed to be between twenty and thirty. Elsewhere will be found full particulars. The body of a sailor came ashore last Friday, near the Light House on Point Peter, no signs of a wreck were visible, but it is supposed that the vessel to which he belonged has been swamped and all hands have perished. Several vessels are reported to be ashore in close proximity to Weller's Bay, but we believe, no lives were lost.

The propeller Adriatic arrived yesterday from Chicago, reports very heavy weather all the passage. While lying at South Manitou, she experienced a heavy gale from north-east.

The schooner Rapid bound up, in getting under way to proceed on her voyage, ran into the brig Ellen Parker bound down with wheat, striking her amidship and cutting her down badly. The Captain of the Ellen Parker finding her sinking got her in shore as near the beach as he could. She was full of water when she reached the shore. The cargo will be a total loss, and probably the vessel. After she reached the shore the schooner Eldred dragged her anchors and backed into the Parker, carrying away her bowsprit, and damaging her badly about the bow. The Eldrid lost her rudder, damaged her sternpost, etc., so that she could not proceed on her trip. She was bound up. The Rapid carried away all her head gear and is somewhat damaged about her bows though not very seriously.

The Propeller Wisconsin, Captain Hickey, was towed here from the canal for repairs to machinery, as mentioned she would be in yesterday's paper. She arrived at 6 o'clock Monday evening, towed down by the R.L. Howard. We visited her yesterday morning, and saw the man who was scalded. He was alive, but probably could not survive. Dr. Pilot was called to attend him, and he was soon removed to the hospital. He is a single man and resides in Oswego.

The Canadian steamer City of Hamilton, with a cargo of flour, is ashore on Nicholson's Island, Lake Ontario. She has 7 feet water in her hold.

The schooner Isaac Buchanan is ashore at Presque Isle, Lake Ontario.

The following are the particulars of the stranding of the steamer City of Hamilton, for which we are indebted to Mr. G.H. Wyatt. On Tuesday night last, when about 12 miles out from Long Point, bound down for Cape Vincent, the steamer sprang a leak aft in her stuffing box. She was immediately headed for the shore, but the water gained so fast upon them that it put out the fires, and it was only by throwing overboard part of her flour that she was kept afloat until she grounded off Nicholson's Island. By the assistance of the steamers Banshee and Traveller, and a steam tug from Oswego, she was got off and towed over to Oswego on Thursday, at which port she now is. It is not supposed that the flour, which was forwarded by the Banshee, will be much damaged. The flour thrown overboard has nearly all been picked up by the crew, although the barrels were much broken.

A telegram received in Buffalo, on the 13th inst., contained the following announcement:- "The propeller Manhattan arrived at Cleveland yesterday, with advices to the 30th ult., from Superior city. The captain says he has never known such a continued series of terrible gales as he has encountered on this trip. The steamer Superior, bound up from Chicago, with a full load of freight and passengers, left the canal on the 25th, since which time she has not been seen or heard of. It is supposed she has gone down with all on board. The schooner E.C. Roberts, which left Portage entry on the 30th ult., and the steamer Lady Elgin, which left St. Mary's River for Chicago on the 3rd inst., have not been heard of, and it is feared they are also lost.

By a gentleman from Lake Superior, says the Detroit Tribune, we learn that the steamer Superior, Capt. Jones, from Chicago for Superior City and intermediate ports, is supposed to be lost. She passed through the canal, bound up, Oct. 20th, and it is supposed went down the next day or night, somewhere near Grand Island, with all on board. Vessels have been partially around the lake since, and nothing has been heard of her. She had about 30 passengers. There was a severe gale on the 30th, which strengthens our surmise. The Superior was an old boat, and would not be able to stand a very heavy storm.

Imports - Nov. 17th - Prop. Oliver Cromwell, Detroit, 3,410 bbls. flour, Walker & Perry.

Sloop Messenger, Oswego, 47 cords wood, J. Holland.

Str. Cataract, Oswego, (gen. cargo).

Sloop Rough & Ready, French Creek, 28 cords wood, J. Campbell.

Schooner Mary Adelaide, Oswego, 4 bbls. salt, 2 kegs beer, W. Cummings; 6 bbls. oil, J. Carruthers & Co.

Nov. 18th - Schooner D. Williams, Oswego, 25 tons Lehigh coal, J. Honeyman.

Exports - Nov. 17th - Schooner J.H. Drake, Chicago, 200,000 feet sawed lumber.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Publication:
18 Nov 1856
Local identifier:
KN.7776
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 44.22976 Longitude: -76.48098
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Creative Commons licence:
pd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Comment on this item
Groups of Related Records
Kingston Newspaper clippings
Other Web sites/External links
Daily British Whig, 18 November 1856 Daily British Whig, 18 November 1856
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










Daily British Whig (Kingston, ON), 18 Nov 1856