The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
British Whig (Kingston, ON), 10 Jun 1892


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p.1 An All Night Meeting - excursion on str. Maud to Gananoque last night; on way back she ran on a shoal off Long Island park in the fog, didn't get back until 7 a.m.

MARINE INTELLIGENCE.

The tug Bronson was dry-docked today to have her wheel tightened.

The str. Spartan after having her machinery fixed left for Toronto yesterday afternoon.

Clearances: tug Bronson, Montreal, with barges; str. Wergeland, Norway; prop. Acadia for Duluth for (sic) coal.

Arrivals: prop. Argonaut, Chicago, 5,000 bushels corn; prop. Niagara and consorts Lisgar and Grimsby, 55,763 bushels grain; schr. Kildonan, Fort William, 34,000 bushels wheat, schr. Minnedosa, 59,000 bushels; prop. Tilley, Fort William, grain; str. Rideau Belle, Ottawa.

p.4

THERE WAS A COLLISION.

The Algerian Ran into the Steambarge Tecumseh.

The str. Algerian arrived in port about 8:30 o'clock this morning, having met with a bad collision in the fog, some place off the Ducks, with the steambarge Tecumseh, en route up with a tow. Mr. Connolly, one of the directors of the Richelieu & Ontario navigation company, says the Algerian was constantly blowing her whistle and did not hear anything of the other vessel until they were in such close proximity that it was impossible to check the speed of the Algerian. The Algerian's bow was stove in for a distance of about eight feet, but fortunately the water-tight bulkhead prevented damage. The Algerian struck the Tecumseh about her quarter on the starboard side. The passengers who wished were transferred to the G.T.R. this morning, as it was deemed advisable not to run the rapids. Mr. Connolly estimates the immediate loss at about $2,000.

F. Brown, son of Dr. Brown was a passenger on board the Algerian and says such a scene as followed the collision he had never seen nor did he wish to ever again experience a similar affair. He was lying awake in his berth and heard the answering whistle of the Tecumseh in the distance. "At last the bells rang for the Algerian's engine to stop. I had a sort of presentiment that there was something wrong. However, I was not long to be left in bewilderment, and had hardly time to turn the matter over in my mind before the collision came. And then, great Scot! what a crash. I was sent flying out of my bed, and, after being knocked against the partition, lit on the floor. The clatter of broken glass and ladies' screams soon served to collect my scattered senses and I was up and on my feet in a second. Having an idea what had occurred my first impulse was to pull on my trousers, which I did with great difficulty, everything having been turned topsy-turvy about the room. I then grabbed a couple of life preservers, lying in the room, and strapped them around me, although I must say that if I had had occasion to test the corks it would have cost my life the way I adjusted them. Rushing out on deck I found men, women and children hurring about almost frantic. The excitement was at its height and four or five women fainted away. The officers of the steamer did their utmost to console the travellers, but to no avail and it was not until after the hull had been examined and asserted not to be in a dangerous state that the people would don their clothing. It was a sight to be vividly remembered as long as I live. Why you can form no idea of the intense excitement that prevailed. No one attempted to sleep after that. There was a Scotch tourist and his wife on board, who were just completing an extended trip of the continent. Capt. McGrath displayed great coolness and precision on the occasion. There was talk among the passengers of some of the crew, Frenchmen, lowering the life-boat and preparing to leave the steamer, but upon being threatened by the captain they dared not desert. I saw the yawl boat alongside and the men standing around with life preservers on."


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Publication:
10 Jun 1892
Local identifier:
KN.16585a
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 44.22976 Longitude: -76.48098
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Creative Commons licence:
pd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Daily British Whig, 10 June 1892 Daily British Whig, 10 June 1892
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British Whig (Kingston, ON), 10 Jun 1892