The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 20 May 1905


Description
Full Text
STEAMER BADGER STATE IS ALL READY TO DO BUSINESS IN THE POOL ROOM LINE
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Craft is Anchored Near Peche Island in Canadian Waters and Within the Jurisdiction of the Ontario Government.
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Photo caption:
STEAMER BADGER STATE, THE FLOATING POOLROOM
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Toronto, Ont., May 19 -(Special.)- A telegram concerning the floating poolroom reached Hon. J.O. Reaume this afternoon, and was immediately directed to the attorney-general's department. Dr. Reaume stated afterwards that his views on poolrooms are well known.

The attorney-general made no further reply than to say that no official notice had reached the department. It is a significant fact, however, that a similar institution was put out of business at Toronto Junction this week under orders from the attorney-general. The province has jurisdiction to the boundary line, contrary to the popular impression.

The steamer BADGER STATE, the floating poolroom mentioned in the foregoing dispatch, is already anchored in the Detroit river near Peche Island, on the Canadian side, and is ready for business. Jerry Faivey, the promoter of the enterprise, says that nothing but the poolroom form of gambling will be tolerated.

The upper deck is fitted out with a blackboard and all the paraphernalia necessary for an up-to-date establishment, including a buffet and a bar. The steamer HATTIE will make regular trips to the BADGER STATE, and all small boats will be welcome, of course. That is, providing the Canadian government does not break up the little scheme.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Original:
20 May 1905
Local identifier:
GLN.30986
Language of Item:
English
Donor:
Ray Grant
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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Maritime History of the Great Lakes
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Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI), 20 May 1905