The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
British Whig (Kingston, ON), 19 Oct 1907


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Full Text

p.2

MARINE NEWS.

The schooner Mary Ann Lydon cleared for Oswego today.

The fish boat C.W. Cole is here from Cape Vincent.

The schooner W.J. Suffel arrived from Oswego with coal for P. Walsh.

The steamer Bermuda has arrived at Garden Island from the west with a load of timber.

The steambarge Navajo arrived from Whitby, and cleared for Montreal with grain.

Swift's: steamers Hamilton down tonight; Belleville up today; Dundurn down today; Aletha, from bay points.

The steamer Alexandria called at Folger's, Friday night, on her up trip, and left considerable freight for local firms.

The schooner Charley Marshall, when within twenty miles of Cobourg, yesterday, had to set back, owing to a heavy gale. She came all the way to Kingston, and is now at the penitentiary.

M.T. Co.'s elevator: tug Bronson up with three light barges, cleared for Montreal with three grain-laden barges; steamer Bothnia touched here for coal, on her way to Oswego; steamer Stormount cleared for Fort William; steamer Dundee cleared for the upper lakes; steamer Vail and consorts, Connolly Bros., cleared for Oswego to load coal for the upper lakes.

p.3 Picton, Oct. 19th - The steamer Cornelia, coal laden, ran aground while entering the harbor, yesterday, and was pulled off bottom by the yacht Madge. She is unloading at Ostranders. The schooner William Jamieson has gone into winter quarters in Low's cove.

p.5 Was Just In Time - The schooner Bertha Kalkins, which arrived on Friday, from Oswego, with coal for Sowards, came within an ace of being tied up on this side of the bridge, as a result of the accident to the bridge. The schooner was the last to pass through, and that was just a few minutes before the accident occurred. Had the boat been held up, it would, of course, delayed the unloading of the coal.

p.8 A Splendid Hull - M.B. Mills, Napanee, is engaged in building a new sailing yacht. The boat is forty feet eight inches in length and thirteen feet beam. The keel weighs two tons, and is composed of oak and iron. The bottom is being built of white oak up to about eight inches above the water line, the boards being from twenty-nine to forty-three feet in length. It will be one of the staunchest and most comfortable crafts in the district.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Publication:
19 Oct 1907
Local identifier:
KN.17525A144
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 44.22976 Longitude: -76.48098
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Creative Commons licence:
pd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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British Whig (Kingston, ON), 19 Oct 1907