The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
British Whig (Kingston, ON), 13 Nov 1907


Description
Full Text

p.2 Captain Married - Capt. George Horne, mariner of Wolfe Island, married Mrs. Mary Derry.

MARINE NEWS.

The schooner Charlie Marshall is laid up for the winter at Cobourg.

Crawford's: schooner Mary Ann Lydon, from Oswego, with coal.

The schooners Suffel and St. Louis clearing Tuesday, are windbound at the Point.

The tug Little Mack, with barge loaded with lumber, from Rideau Canal, arrived here this morning.

Swift's: steamers Hamilton down tonight; Belleville up tonight; Cornwall down tonight; Dundurn down tonight; Aletha, from bay points; schooner Clara, from Oswego, with coal.

The steamer Rosemount left today for Port Dalhousie with the bow portion of the C.P.R. steamer Keewatin. The C.P.R. tug Lord Strathcona accompanied the steamer for fear of accidents.

Richardsons' elevator: steamer Wasaga from Fort William, 70,000 bushels of oats and wheat; steamer Cuba loading grain for Montreal; steamer City of New York loading grain for Quebec, also steamer Cataract.

M.T. Co.'s elevator: tug Thomson up, four light barges; schooner Ford River, from Sodus, coal; steamer Rosemount, Fort William, 80,000 bushels of wheat, with barge Melrose, from Ashtabula, loaded with coal; tug Emerson and barge Ungava from Charlotte, with coal.

BARGE WAS SUNK.

In an accident which occurred in the Lachine canal, on Tuesday night, the barge Regina, owned by the M.T. Co., was sunk and the barge Huron was also badly damaged. The mishap was due to the steamer Neepawah running into the gates at lock No. 1, and carrying them away. Both barges were loaded with grain. The Regina is in thirty feet of water.

The telegraphic despatch of the accident reads:

The steamer Neepawah carried away the gates of the canal, at Montreal, and the great rush of water swept two or three vessels down into the river with great force. The barge Regina was sunk and about $50,000 damage done to shipping in general.

p.4 Gananoque, Nov. 13th - The Merchants' Montreal liner Cuba, which has been unloading for the past week at Robertson's sheds, steamed out of the creek on her return this morning. She is the largest vessel that ever entered the creek here, and had on board 525 tons of coal.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Publication:
13 Nov 1907
Local identifier:
KN.17525A164
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 44.22976 Longitude: -76.48098
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Creative Commons licence:
pd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
Contact
Maritime History of the Great Lakes
Email
WWW address
Powered by / Alimenté par VITA Toolkit




My favourites lets you save items you like, tag them and group them into collections for your own personal use. Viewing "My favourites" will open in a new tab. Login here or start a My favourites account.










British Whig (Kingston, ON), 13 Nov 1907