The Maritime History of the Great Lakes
British Whig (Kingston, ON), 21 Jun 1910


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p.2

CAPT. J.F. ALLEN DEAD.

He Was For Fifty-Five Years A Mariner.

Capt. James F. Allen, of Kingston, died at three o'clock Tuesday morning, at the residence of his son, William Allen, in Chicago, after a long illness of cancer of the stomach. Last fall Capt. Allen retired from active steamboat service, and early in the winter went to Chicago in the hope that a change would do him good. He grew worse, however, and for the past three weeks was in a very low condition, his death being daily expected. His remains will be brought to Cape Vincent, N.Y., his birthplace, and interment will take place on Thursday morning. The funeral will be conducted by the Masonic order.

When Capt. Allen retired last autumn, he had completed fifty-five years as a mariner. He began his long and successful life on the water in 1855, when fifteen years of age. Forty years of his career were spent with the Folgers, of Kingston.

Capt. Allen was born in Cape Vincent, N.Y., in 1840. His first marine experience was scowing on the river. In 1857 he became master of the scow Hannah Francis. His father moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1860, and he accompanied him. He worked for a while in the shipyard of Peck & Masters.

In 1863, he served 100 days in the fortifications at Washington with the National Guard, that being the service period. During his service, Washington was attacked by the Southern General Early. Soon afterwards, Capt. Allen went to Bridgeport, Ala., and entered the service of Uncle Sam, building two river boats for the purpose of carrying provisions to Chateauguay on Tennessee. He was on one of the boats when it ran the blockade off Lookout Mountain. The southern soldiers, stationed on this hill, disabled the steamer's stack with their fire, but it was repaired, and the vessels delivered the provisions and made a safe return.

In the spring of 1865, Capt. Allen entered the service of the Erie Steamboat company. In the winter he worked in the shipyard, thus gaining a good knowledge of vessel construction.

In the fall of 1867 he returned to Cape Vincent and entered the service of the Folgers. The spring following he sailed the schooner Gazelle, belonging to them, carrying lumber from the Rideau to Oswego. In fall it ran to Toledo, carrying ore up and grain back. The year following he was with his brother in the steamer Tom Martin. The Folgers bought the steamer Kearsage and he took charge of her, sailing her for two years. The following year he fitted out the schooner Prince Albert for the Folgers, and it went into the timber trade at Bay City, Mich.

In 1871 Capt. Allen came to Kingston, and bought a half interest in the tugs Franklin and Mixer from the Chaffey Brothers. Later, the Folgers bought the other half interest. Capt. Allen also represented as local inspector for thirteen insurance companies, his duty being to see that transhipped grain went into standard river barges. Capt. Allen converted the tug Franklin into the Fred. Folger. The tugs were then sold to the Dominion Wrecking company. The captain then went back to sailing vessels, having charge of the Prince Albert, Brooklyn, and Watertown, in which the Folgers were interested. In the fall of 1880 or 1881, he was engaged at the Thousand Island Park, laying out that place for resort purposes.

During 1883 and 1884, Capt. Allen was with the Calvin company, in charge of the wrecking plant. In 1885 he sailed the steamer Annie Laurie between Cape Vincent and Alexandria Bay. From 1887 till 1909, with the exception of 1904, when he was in charge of Senator Fulford's steamyacht, Capt. Allen was with the Folgers, having commanded all the steamers of the White Squadron. He began with the steamer Pierrepont, and ended with that boat.

Capt. Allen had the reputation of being one of the most skilful and careful navigators on fresh water. He held lake as well as river certificates. He was a popular steamboat man, and all his old friends are saddened over the thought that they will see him on the bridge no more. He has entered the last port.

The late Capt. Allen is survived by his wife and four sons, William, Mortimer and Gordon in Chicago and Frederick in Cleveland. He was connected with the First Congregational church. In politics he was a liberal. The flags on vessels along the harbor are at half mast out of respect to the memory of the deceased veteran mariner.

(includes photograph "The Late Capt. J.F. Allen")

p.5

IN MARINE CIRCLES.

The steamer Toronto passed down and up today.

The schooner Kitchen is in the government dry dock, being repaired.

The government boat Loretta will clear today for Rideau canal ports.

The steamer Phelps and barge have arrived at Davis' dry dock to undergo repairs.

The steamer Alexandria passed down on Monday night with considerable freight and quite a large number of passengers. Now that the weather is warm, the passenger trade is getting heavier every day.

M.T. Co.'s elevator: tugs Thomson and Glide arrived from Montreal with five light barges; tug Thomson cleared for Montreal with two grain barges; the steamer Fairmount is expected to arrive from Fort William, Wednesday afternoon, with a cargo of wheat and oats and will discharge here.

p.8

ELECTED DIRECTORS.

The annual meeting of the Kingston Yacht Club Association was held on Monday evening. These directors were elected: H.W. Richardson, E.C. Gildersleeve, G.Y. Chown, W.B. Dalton, W.C. Kent, John McKay and D.A. Black. The officers are: President, H.W. Richardson; vice-president E.C. Gildersleeve; secretary-treasurer, James H. Macnee.

Daily Standard, June 21, 1910

p.1

MARINE INTELLIGENCE.

Matters were dull on the water front today.

The Government steamer Loretta arrived yesterday with Mr. Phillips, superintendent of the Rideau Canal, and family on board.

The steamer Alexandria will begin to run all the way to Quebec on July 4th.

All the St. Lawrence River Steamboat Co.'s fleet are now in commission.

M.T. Co. arrivals - The tugs Thomson and Glide from Montreal, with five light barges. Cleared - The tug Thomson, for Montreal, with two grain barges. The steamer Fairmount is expected tomorrow evening, with wheat and oats from Fort William.

Swift & Co. arrivals - The steamer Toronto up and down today.

The schr. Keewatin cleared from the Penitentiary for Oswego to load coal for Swift & Co.

p.2 Ran On a Shoal - The steamer Phoenix, recently added to the Hall fleet at Ogdensburg, ran on the Sister Light shoal on Friday night, the accident being caused by the parting of the steering cable. Little damage was sustained.

CAPT. ALLEN DEAD.

He Was For Fifty Five Years A Mariner.

Capt. James F. Allen, of Kingston, died at three o'clock Tuesday morning, at the residence of his son, William Allen, in Chicago, after a long illness of cancer of the stomach. Last fall Capt. Allen retired from active steamboat service, and early in the winter went to Chicago, in the hope that a change would do him good. He grew worse, however, and for the past three weeks was in a very low condition, his death being daily expected. His remains will be brought to Cape Vincent, N.Y., his birthplace, and internment will take place on Thursday morning. The funeral will be conducted by the Masonic order.

When Capt. Allen retired, last autumn, he had completed fifty-five years as a mariner. He began his long and successful life on the water in 1855, when fifteen years of age. Forty years of his career were spent with the Folgers, of Kingston.

Capt. Allen was born in Cape Vincent, N.Y., in 1840. His first marine experience was scowing on the river. In 1857 he became master of the scow Hannah Francis. His father moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1860, and he accompanied him. He worked for a while in the shipyard of Peck & Masters.

In 1863, he served 100 days in the fortifications at Washington with the National Guard, that being the service period. During his service, Washington was attacked by the Southern General Early. Soon afterwards, Capt. Allen went to Bridgeport, Ala., and entered the service of Uncle Sam, building two river boats for the purpose of carrying provisions to Chateauguay on Tennessee. He was on one of the boats when it ran the blockade off Lookout Mountain. The southern soldiers, stationed on this hill, disabled the steamer's stack with their fire, but it was repaired, and the vessels delivered the provisions and made a safe return.

In the spring of 1865, Capt. Allen entered the service of the Erie Steamboat company. In the winter he worked in the shipyard, thus gaining a good knowledge of vessel construction.

In the fall of 1867 he returned to Cape Vincent and entered the service of the Folgers. The spring following he sailed the schooner Gazelle, belonging to them, carrying lumber from the Rideau to Oswego. In fall it ran to Toledo, carrying ore up and grain back. The year following he was with his brother in the steamer Tom Martin. The Folgers bought the steamer Kearsage and he took charge of her, sailing her for two years. The following year he fitted out the schooner Prince Albert for the Folgers, and it went into the timber trade at Bay City, Mich.

In 1871 Capt. Allen came to Kingston, and bought a half interest in the tugs Franklin and Mixer from the Chaffey Brothers. Later, the Folgers bought the other half interest. Capt. Allen also represented as local inspector for thirteen insurance companies, his duty being to see that transhipped grain went into standard river barges. Capt. Allen converted the tug Franklin into the Fred. Folger. The tugs were then sold to the Dominion Wrecking company. The captain then went back to sailing vessels, having charge of the Prince Albert, Brooklyn, and Watertown, in which the Folgers were interested. In the fall of 1880 or 1881, he was engaged at the Thousand Island Park, laying out that place for resort purposes.

During 1883 and 1884, Capt. Allen was with the Calvin company, in charge of the wrecking plant. In 1885 he sailed the steamer Annie Laurie between Cape Vincent and Alexandria Bay. From 1887 till 1909, with the exception of 1904, when he was in charge of Senator Fulford's steamyacht, Capt. Allen was with the Folgers, having commanded all the steamers of the White Squadron. He began with the steamer Pierrepont, and ended with that boat.

Capt. Allen had the reputation of being one of the most skilful and careful navigators on fresh water. He held lake as well as river certificates. He was a popular steamboat man, and all his old friends are saddened over the thought that they will see him on the bridge no more. He has entered the last port.

The late Capt. Allen is survived by his wife and four sons, William, Mortimer and Gordon in Chicago and Frederick in Cleveland. He was connected with the First Congregational church. In politics he was a liberal. The flags on vessels along the harbor are at half mast out of respect to the memory of the deceased veteran mariner.

p.6 Damaged By Spiles - While sailing along below the bridge recently a gasoline launch struck one of the spiles in the old spile dock, badly scratching the hull of the boat. The owner is highly incensed and wants to know why the spiles are not removed.


Media Type:
Text
Newspaper
Item Type:
Clippings
Date of Publication:
21 Jun 1910
Local identifier:
KN.17817a
Language of Item:
English
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 44.22976 Longitude: -76.48098
Donor:
Rick Neilson
Creative Commons licence:
pd [more details]
Copyright Statement:
Public domain: Copyright has expired according to the applicable Canadian or American laws. No restrictions on use.
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British Whig (Kingston, ON), 21 Jun 1910