Toronto Harbour and the Defence of the Great Lakes Region, 1783-1870
Publication
The Northern Mariner / Le marin du nord (St. John's, NL), Jan 1994, p. 1-15
Description
Creator
Benn, Carl, Author
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Articles
Description
The history of Toronto harbour and the defence of the Great Lakes region has two main elements. First, various military planners in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries perceived merit in establishing a naval base at Toronto, although for the most part they were unable to fulfil their goals. Second, debate on Toronto's potential always occurred within a broader discussion ofthe region's strategic requirements. This paper will explore these two themes from the end of the American Revolution, when the British first took an interest in Toronto's naval potential, to 1870, when imperial forces withdrew from central Canada.
Date of Publication
Jan 1994
Date Of Event
1783-1870
Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.6355405096262 Longitude: -79.3847143066406
Copyright Statement
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rights holder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Holder
Canadian Nautical Research Society
Recommended Citation
The Northern Mariner/le Marin du nord,IV,No.1 (January 1994),1-15.
Contact
Canadian Nautical Research Society
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Toronto Harbour and the Defence of the Great Lakes Region, 1783-1870


The history of Toronto harbour and the defence of the Great Lakes region has two main elements. First, various military planners in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries perceived merit in establishing a naval base at Toronto, although for the most part they were unable to fulfil their goals. Second, debate on Toronto's potential always occurred within a broader discussion ofthe region's strategic requirements. This paper will explore these two themes from the end of the American Revolution, when the British first took an interest in Toronto's naval potential, to 1870, when imperial forces withdrew from central Canada.