"Stars and Garters of an Admiral": American Commodores in the War of 1812
Publication
The Northern Mariner / Le marin du nord (St. John's, NL), Jan 2006, p. 53-63
Description
Creator
Malcomson, Robert, Author
Media Type
Text
Item Type
Articles
Description
During the War of 1812, the American Navy was still in its developmental stage, from the point of view of its policies and traditions. An obvious sign of this development was the general use of the term "Commodore" which was not an official rank at the time. This article is a preliminary survey that explains how the official representatives of the Naval Service Department and naval officers used the term "commodore" during their official communications and also demonstrates that during the war only four senior officers received this honorary rank consistently and
frequently. The less common use of this term is also analyzed and with supporting evidence, this article illustrates the discord among the officers.
Date of Publication
Jan 2006
Date Of Event
1812-1814
Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Copyright Statement
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rights holder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Copyright Holder
Canadian Nautical Research Society
Recommended Citation
The Northern Mariner/Le marin du nord, XVI No1,(January2006),53-63.
Contact
Canadian Nautical Research Society
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"Stars and Garters of an Admiral": American Commodores in the War of 1812


During the War of 1812, the American Navy was still in its developmental stage, from the point of view of its policies and traditions. An obvious sign of this development was the general use of the term "Commodore" which was not an official rank at the time. This article is a preliminary survey that explains how the official representatives of the Naval Service Department and naval officers used the term "commodore" during their official communications and also demonstrates that during the war only four senior officers received this honorary rank consistently and
frequently. The less common use of this term is also analyzed and with supporting evidence, this article illustrates the discord among the officers.