Expansion of Regulated Modern Shore-Station Whaling in Newfoundland and Labrador, 1902-03
Publication
The Northern Mariner / Le marin du nord (St. John's, NL), April 1991
Description
Creators
Sanger, C. W.
Dickinson, A. B.
Media Type
Website
Text
Item Type
Articles
Description
"Modern" shore-station whaling began in Norwegian coastal waters in 1868 as a consequence of new technology introduced by Svend Foyn. Subsequent over-exploitation caused Norwegian whaling investors to look elsewhere for profitable unutilized stocks, thus commencing a west- ward expansion of the industry which reached Newfoundland in 1896. In that year, local and Norwegian entrepreneurs entered into a joint venture to form the Cabot Steam Whaling Co. Ltd., which took three seasons from 1898 to establish a viable industry from stations at Snook's Arm and Balaena on the northeast and south coasts of the island (see Figure 1). Its success convinced other Newfoundlanders to make speculative investments in the industry, this time without Norwegian input other than experienced catcher crews. The second company, the Newfoundland Steam Whaling Co. Ltd., was established in 1900 and operated from a station at Reuben's Cove in Chaleur Bay, also on the island's south coast. This ongoing expansion of the industry led to concerns by shareholders and fishermen about possible over-exploitation of the resource, foreign dominance of the industry and detrimental effects on the inshore fishery. In response, the Newfoundland government attempted to control growth by introducing on 22 April 1902 an "Act to Regulate the Whaling Industry." This legislation defined various operat- ing conditions, including requirements for licences, fees and minimum distances between stations. Catch quotas, however, were not set, although each station could only be supplied by one catcher.1 This paper documents the continued expansion of this now regulated industry and its consolidation into a locally-important component of the maritime and resource exploi- tation history of Newfoundland and Labrador.
Date of Original
April 1991
Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
Copyright Statement
Copyright status unknown. Responsibility for determining the copyright status and any use rests exclusively with the user.
Recommended Citation
The Northern Mariner/Le Marin du nord, I, No. 2 (April 1991), 1-22.
Contact
Canadian Nautical Research Society
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Expansion of Regulated Modern Shore-Station Whaling in Newfoundland and Labrador, 1902-03


"Modern" shore-station whaling began in Norwegian coastal waters in 1868 as a consequence of new technology introduced by Svend Foyn. Subsequent over-exploitation caused Norwegian whaling investors to look elsewhere for profitable unutilized stocks, thus commencing a west- ward expansion of the industry which reached Newfoundland in 1896. In that year, local and Norwegian entrepreneurs entered into a joint venture to form the Cabot Steam Whaling Co. Ltd., which took three seasons from 1898 to establish a viable industry from stations at Snook's Arm and Balaena on the northeast and south coasts of the island (see Figure 1). Its success convinced other Newfoundlanders to make speculative investments in the industry, this time without Norwegian input other than experienced catcher crews. The second company, the Newfoundland Steam Whaling Co. Ltd., was established in 1900 and operated from a station at Reuben's Cove in Chaleur Bay, also on the island's south coast. This ongoing expansion of the industry led to concerns by shareholders and fishermen about possible over-exploitation of the resource, foreign dominance of the industry and detrimental effects on the inshore fishery. In response, the Newfoundland government attempted to control growth by introducing on 22 April 1902 an "Act to Regulate the Whaling Industry." This legislation defined various operat- ing conditions, including requirements for licences, fees and minimum distances between stations. Catch quotas, however, were not set, although each station could only be supplied by one catcher.1 This paper documents the continued expansion of this now regulated industry and its consolidation into a locally-important component of the maritime and resource exploi- tation history of Newfoundland and Labrador.