The Prospects for Naval History
Publication
The Northern Mariner / Le marin du nord (St. John's, NL), Oct 1991, p. 19 - 26
Description
Creator
Douglas, W. A. B.
Media Type
Website
Text
Item Type
Articles
Description
Serving naval personnel in Canada, whose company we so warmly welcome and of which we have too often been deprived at meetings of the Canadian Nautical Research Society, have a special need to know and understand Canadian naval history when, as is now so patently ob- vious, the axe is in danger of falling on the navy. The moment is opportune. Books and articles about Canadian naval history are increasing in number to such a degree that there no longer is - as there once was - a shortage of material on the subject. Disagreements there may be, and the resultant healthy debate — but no briefing note, no staff appreciation, no white paper concerning Canada's naval policy, no manual of naval doctrine for the Canadian Armed Forces (and of course these remarks apply to all aspects of the military experience, but the occasion demands particular attention to the seagoing profession) should see the light of day before it has been tempered by the fire of historical process.
Date of Publication
Oct 1991
Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Copyright Statement
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rights holder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Canadian Nautical Research Society
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The Prospects for Naval History


Serving naval personnel in Canada, whose company we so warmly welcome and of which we have too often been deprived at meetings of the Canadian Nautical Research Society, have a special need to know and understand Canadian naval history when, as is now so patently ob- vious, the axe is in danger of falling on the navy. The moment is opportune. Books and articles about Canadian naval history are increasing in number to such a degree that there no longer is - as there once was - a shortage of material on the subject. Disagreements there may be, and the resultant healthy debate — but no briefing note, no staff appreciation, no white paper concerning Canada's naval policy, no manual of naval doctrine for the Canadian Armed Forces (and of course these remarks apply to all aspects of the military experience, but the occasion demands particular attention to the seagoing profession) should see the light of day before it has been tempered by the fire of historical process.