Some Revisionist History in the Battle of the Atlantic
Publication
The Northern Mariner / Le marin du nord (St. John's, NL), Oct 1991, p. 27-32
Description
Creator
McKee, Fraser M.
Media Type
Website
Text
Item Type
Articles
Description
Most historians decry historical revision undertaken solely for political aims. The past Soviet tendency to do this has caused much derision, even domestically; under a new regime, this provides considerable scope even to their historians. In addition, many scholars respond negatively to the all too-common practice of second-guessing the commanders of the day. Yet some cases remain controversial, as shown by a recent reassessment of Admiral Lord Mountbatten's personal responsibility for the disastrous raid on Dieppe in 1942.1 But because of the availability of huge quantities of former enemy documents, some naval history is rightly being rewritten to revise erroneous wartime judgements. This is certainly the case in assessing credits for the destruction in World War II of German U-Boats and Italian sommergibili.
Date of Publication
Oct 1991
Date Of Event
1939 - 1945
Subject(s)
Language of Item
English
Geographic Coverage
  • North Carolina, United States
    Latitude: 35.22546 Longitude: -75.5621
Copyright Statement
Protected by copyright: Uses other than research or private study require the permission of the rights holder(s). Responsibility for obtaining permissions and for any use rests exclusively with the user.
Contact
Canadian Nautical Research Society
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Some Revisionist History in the Battle of the Atlantic


Most historians decry historical revision undertaken solely for political aims. The past Soviet tendency to do this has caused much derision, even domestically; under a new regime, this provides considerable scope even to their historians. In addition, many scholars respond negatively to the all too-common practice of second-guessing the commanders of the day. Yet some cases remain controversial, as shown by a recent reassessment of Admiral Lord Mountbatten's personal responsibility for the disastrous raid on Dieppe in 1942.1 But because of the availability of huge quantities of former enemy documents, some naval history is rightly being rewritten to revise erroneous wartime judgements. This is certainly the case in assessing credits for the destruction in World War II of German U-Boats and Italian sommergibili.